News

BHM Presents Savor the Memories Preserving Family Recipes: How to Save and Celebrate your Food Traditions

Savor the Memories

Preserving Family Recipes: How to Save and Celebrate your Food Traditions

Cartersville, GA – May 5, 2016 – The Bartow History Museum welcomes Valerie Frey, who will discuss her latest book, Preserving Family Recipes: How to Save and Celebrate your Food Traditions, on May 18th at noon. Frey will discuss the value of recipes, exploring them as historical documents. She will also talk about working with older recipes, give basic tips on preserving heirloom materials, and briefly discuss what is needed in your “toolkit” to work with family recipes effectively. A book signing will follow. The lecture is free to museum members and included with the price of admission for not-yet-members. For more information on this and other museum programs, call 770-382-3818, ext. 6288 or visit our website at www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

About the Book

Heirloom dishes and family food traditions are rich sources of nostalgia and provide vivid ways to learn about our families’ past, yet they can be problematic. Many family recipes and food traditions are never documented in written or photographic form, existing only as unwritten know-how and lore that vanishes when a cook dies. Even when recipes are written down, they often fail to give the tricks and tips that would allow another cook to accurately replicate the dish. Unfortunately, recipes are also often damaged as we plunk Grandma’s handwritten cards on the countertop next to a steaming pot or a spattering mixer, shortening their lives.

The book is a guide for gathering, adjusting, supplementing, and safely preserving family recipes and for interviewing relatives, collecting oral histories, and conducting kitchen visits to document family food traditions from the everyday to special occasions. It blends commonsense tips with sound archival principles, helping you achieve effective results while avoiding unnecessary pitfalls. Chapters are also dedicated to unfamiliar regional or ethnic cooking challenges, as well as to working with recipes that are “orphans,” surrogates, or terribly outdated. Whether you simply want to save a few accurate recipes, help yesterday’s foodways evolve so they are relevant for today’s table, or create an extensive family cookbook, this guidebook will help you to savor your memories.

About the Author

Valerie J. Frey (pronounced “fry”) is a writer and archivist from Athens, Georgia with projects focusing on genealogy, local history, storytelling, material culture, and the everyday home life of our ancestors. Valerie holds degrees from the University of Georgia and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her archives career began in the Manuscripts Division at the Library of Congress and she went on to serve as an archivist at the Georgia Historical Society, the Savannah Jewish Archives, and the Georgia Archives. She now writes full time. Her most recent book, Preserving Family Recipes: How to Save and Celebrate Your Food Traditions was released in November of 2015 through the University of Georgia Press.

About Bartow History Museum

The Bartow History Museum, located at 4 East Church Street in downtown Cartersville, Georgia, documents the history of northwest Georgia’s Bartow County, spanning more than 200 years since the Cherokee were the area’s primary residents. Artifacts, photographs, documents, and a variety of interactive permanent exhibits tell the story of settlement, Cherokee life and removal, Civil War strife, and lifestyles of years past. The Bartow History Museum also provides a variety of educational opportunities for adults, children, families, and school groups. Our extensive archives and research library contains photographs, documents, newspapers, rare books, genealogy records, oral history interviews, and more. For additional information, visit www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

 

It’s About Time Boutique

Dr. Ann McCleary and Keri Adams From the University of West Georgia Will Discuss,The West Georgia Textile Heritage Trail

 

April 20, Noon – 1 p.m.

Cartersville, GA – April 11, 2016 – The Bartow History Museum announces Dr. Ann McCleary and Keri Adams from the Center for Public History at the University of West Georgia will discuss the Center’s new book, The West Georgia Textile Heritage Trail, on April 20th at noon. The book explores the impact of the textile industry on the region extending from Columbus to Dalton and its residual presence today. Cartersville and Bartow County have strong ties to the textile industry. Horse collar pads, tire cord, chenille, and carpet are just a few of the textile products that have been manufactured in Bartow textile mills over the past 100 years.

The lecture is free to museum members and included with the price of admission for not-yet-members. For more information on this and other museum programs, call 770-382-3818, ext. 6288 or visit our website at www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

About Bartow History Museum

The Bartow History Museum, located at 4 East Church Street in downtown Cartersville, Georgia, documents the history of northwest Georgia’s Bartow County, spanning more than 200 years since the Cherokee were the area’s primary residents. Artifacts, photographs, documents, and a variety of interactive permanent exhibits tell the story of settlement, Cherokee life and removal, Civil War strife, and lifestyles of years past. The Bartow History Museum also provides a variety of educational opportunities for adults, children, families, and school groups. Our extensive archives and research library contains photographs, documents, newspapers, rare books, genealogy records, oral history interviews, and more. For additional information, visit www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

 

Bartow History Museum invites the public to the opening of its newest feature exhibit, In Remembrance: Mourning Through the Ages

 Bartow History Museum invites the public to the opening of its newest feature exhibit, In Remembrance: Mourning Through the Ages, on Thursday, April 28. The exhibit looks back at some of the rituals and customs associated with mourning beginning with the area’s native population centuries ago through the Victorian Period of the late 19th century to customs of more recent times.

Have you ever wondered where the custom of wearing black after death originated or why flowers are displayed at funerals? Mourning, in the simplest sense, is grief over someone’s death, but the word also describes a set of cultural behaviors in which the bereaved participate or are expected to participate. These customs vary between cultures and evolve over time.

The records and social rituals surrounding death are among history’s most important touchstones. In earlier times, a person’s only record of life may have been a death record, such as an obituary, a death certificate, or a tombstone.

According to Trey Gaines, Director of the Museum, “Through stories, photographs, and objects this exhibit will examine tombstone symbols, memorials, death notices and images, and more.

The opening on April 28 will include a reception for museum members at 6:15 p.m. followed by a public lecture beginning at 7:00 p.m. by the directors of Parnick Jennings Funeral Home, a sponsor of the exhibit.

About Bartow History Museum

The Bartow History Museum, located at 4 East Church Street in downtown Cartersville, Georgia, documents the history of northwest Georgia’s Bartow County, spanning more than 200 years since the Cherokee were the area’s primary residents. Artifacts, photographs, documents, and a variety of interactive permanent exhibits tell the story of settlement, Cherokee life and removal, Civil War strife, and lifestyles of years past. The Bartow History Museum also provides a variety of educational opportunities for adults, children, families, and school groups. Our extensive archives and research library contains photographs, documents, newspapers, rare books, genealogy records, oral history interviews, and more. For additional information, visit www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

 

It’s Game Time!

 

Cartersville, GA – April 11, 2016 –Do you have TROUBLE getting your family to unplug? It’s not a TRIVIAL PURSUIT, but you don’t have a MONOPOLY on this problem. The Bartow History Museum is here to help. Join us for our next Museum After Dark event, Family Game Night, to be held on April 22 from 6-9 p.m. at the museum. Play giant board games, vintage games, and make a MEMORY together. If you miss it you’ll be SORRY. There will be game options for all ages. Registration is not required. The event is free to museum members and included with the price of admission for not-yet members. For more information on this and other museum programs, call 770-382-3818, ext. 6288 or visit our website at www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

About Bartow History Museum

The Bartow History Museum, located at 4 East Church Street in downtown Cartersville, Georgia, documents the history of northwest Georgia’s Bartow County, spanning more than 200 years since the Cherokee were the area’s primary residents. Artifacts, photographs, documents, and a variety of interactive permanent exhibits tell the story of settlement, Cherokee life and removal, Civil War strife, and lifestyles of years past. The Bartow History Museum also provides a variety of educational opportunities for adults, children, families, and school groups. Our extensive archives and research library contains photographs, documents, newspapers, rare books, genealogy records, oral history interviews, and more. For additional information, visit www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

 

Georgia First Lady Sandra Deal to speak at the Bartow History Museum

 

March 31, 2016, 7:00 p.m.

Cartersville, GA – March 25, 2016 –

The Bartow History Museum is honored to have Georgia First Lady Sandra Deal and former First Lady Elizabeth Harris at the upcoming Evening Lecture on Thursday, March 31 at 7 p.m.  Mrs. Deal will speak about the new book, Memories of Mansion:  The Story of Georgia’s Governor’s Mansion, which focuses on the stories and experiences of Georgia’s first families.  The book’s co-authors, Drs. Catherine Lewis and Jennifer Dickey, will also speak briefly about their experiences working with the first families to write the book.

 

Due to the large crowd expected to attend, the program will take place in the theater of the Booth Museum, located adjacent to the Bartow History Museum.  Guests may check in at either museum prior to the program.  Following the program, guests will be invited back to the Bartow History Museum for a book signing and dessert reception.

Designed by Atlanta architect A. Thomas Bradbury and opened in 1968, the mansion has been home to eight first families (from Lester Maddox to Nathan Deal) and houses a distinguished collection of American art and antiques. Often called “the people’s house,” the mansion is always on display, always serving the public. “Memories of the Mansion” tells the story of the Georgia Governor’s Mansion—what preceded it and how it came to be as well as the stories of the people who have lived and worked here since its opening in 1968.

“All homes have a story to tell, and the Georgia Governor’s Mansion is no exception,” says first lady Sandra Deal. This richly illustrated book not only documents this extraordinary place and the people who have lived and worked here, but it will also help ensure the preservation of this historic resource so that it may continue to serve the state and its people.

Authors Sandra D. Deal, Jennifer W. Dickey and Catherine M. Lewis worked closely with the former first families (Maddox, Carter, Busbee, Harris, Miller, Barnes and Perdue) to capture behind-the-scenes anecdotes of what life was like in the state’s most public-house.

The lecture is free to members and included with the price of admission for not-yet members. For more information on this and other museum programs, call 770-382-3818, ext. 6288 or visit our website at www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

About the Authors

Sandra Deal is the first lady of Georgia. Jennifer W. Dickey is the coordinator of public history and associate professor of history at Kennesaw State University. Catherine M. Lewis is the assistant vice president of Museums, Archives & Rare Books and a professor of history at Kennesaw State University. The book is published through the University of Georgia Press and in cooperation with the University of Georgia Libraries and Kennesaw State University.

About Bartow History Museum

The Bartow History Museum, located at 4 East Church Street in downtown Cartersville, Georgia, documents the history of northwest Georgia’s Bartow County, spanning more than 200 years since the Cherokee were the area’s primary residents. Artifacts, photographs, documents, and a variety of interactive permanent exhibits tell the story of settlement, Cherokee life and removal, Civil War strife, and lifestyles of years past.  The Bartow History Museum also provides a variety of educational opportunities for adults, children, families, and school groups. Our extensive archives and research library contains photographs, documents, newspapers, rare books, genealogy records, oral history interviews, and more.  For additional information, visit www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

Drs. Catherine Lewis and Jennifer Dickey to Speak About Their New Book,

 

Memories of the Mansion: The Story of Georgia’s Governor’s Mansion

March 31, 2016, 7:00 p.m.

Cartersville, GA – March 17, 2016 – Drs. Catherine Lewis and Jennifer Dickey will speak about their new book, Memories of Mansion: The Story of Georgia’s Governor’s Mansion at the Bartow History Museum on March 31 at 7 p.m., with a book signing to follow. Memories of the Mansion focuses on the stories and experiences of Georgia’s first families. Also in attendance will be former First Lady Elizabeth Harris.

Designed by Atlanta architect A. Thomas Bradbury and opened in 1968, the mansion has been home to eight first families (from Lester Maddox to Nathan Deal) and houses a distinguished collection of American art and antiques. Often called “the people’s house,” the mansion is always on display, always serving the public. “Memories of the Mansion” tells the story of the Georgia Governor’s Mansion—what preceded it and how it came to be as well as the stories of the people who have lived and worked here since its opening in 1968.

“All homes have a story to tell, and the Georgia Governor’s Mansion is no exception,” says first lady Sandra Deal. This richly illustrated book not only documents this extraordinary place and the people who have lived and worked here, but it will also help ensure the preservation of this historic resource so that it may continue to serve the state and its people.

Authors Sandra D. Deal, Jennifer W. Dickey and Catherine M. Lewis worked closely with the former first families (Maddox, Carter, Busbee, Harris, Miller, Barnes and Perdue) to capture behind-the-scenes anecdotes of what life was like in the state’s most public-house.

The lecture is free to members and included with the price of admission for not-yet members. For more information on this and other museum programs, call 770-382-3818, ext. 6288 or visit our website at www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

About the Authors

Sandra Deal is the first lady of Georgia. Jennifer W. Dickey is the coordinator of public history and associate professor of history at Kennesaw State University. Catherine M. Lewis is the assistant vice president of Museums, Archives & Rare Books and a professor of history at Kennesaw State University. The book is published through the University of Georgia Press and in cooperation with the University of Georgia Libraries and Kennesaw State University.

About Bartow History Museum

The Bartow History Museum, located at 4 East Church Street in downtown Cartersville, Georgia, documents the history of northwest Georgia’s Bartow County, spanning more than 200 years since the Cherokee were the area’s primary residents. Artifacts, photographs, documents, and a variety of interactive permanent exhibits tell the story of settlement, Cherokee life and removal, Civil War strife, and lifestyles of years past. The Bartow History Museum also provides a variety of educational opportunities for adults, children, families, and school groups. Our extensive archives and research library contains photographs, documents, newspapers, rare books, genealogy records, oral history interviews, and more. For additional information, visit www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

 

Get Your Irish On and Join Us! Dr. Bryan McGovern to Discuss the History of St. Patrick’s Day

 

March 16, Noon – 1 p.m.

Cartersville, GA – March 1, 2016 – Dr. Bryan McGovern, professor and author, will speak on the history of St. Patrick’s Day on March 16th at noon at the Bartow History Museum. His presentation will include how Irish and Irish-American nationalists co-opted the day in the late-18th and 19th centuries to further their agenda. Once a solemn religious holiday, associated with the color blue in Ireland, it has become a green affair imbued with idyllic images of the homeland and celebration.

Bryan McGovern is an Associate Professor of History at Kennesaw State. He is the author of John Mitchel: Irish Nationalist, Southern Secessionist (2009) and co-author of The Fenians: Irish Rebellion in the North Atlantic World, 1858-1876 (2013), as well as articles, chapters, and book reviews on Irish and Irish-American nationalism.

The lecture is free to members and included with the price of admission for not-yet-members. For more information on this and other museum programs, call 770-382-3818, ext. 6288 or visit our website at www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

About Bartow History Museum

The Bartow History Museum, located at 4 East Church Street in downtown Cartersville, Georgia, documents the history of northwest Georgia’s Bartow County, spanning more than 200 years since the Cherokee were the area’s primary residents. Artifacts, photographs, documents, and a variety of interactive permanent exhibits tell the story of settlement, Cherokee life and removal, Civil War strife, and lifestyles of years past. The Bartow History Museum also provides a variety of educational opportunities for adults, children, families, and school groups. Our extensive archives and research library contains photographs, documents, newspapers, rare books, genealogy records, oral history interviews, and more. For additional information, visit www.bartowhistorymuseum.org.

 

LIVE BUNNY Portraits Tonsmeire Studio

 

LIVE BUNNY Portraits

Tonsmeire Studio

March 25th, 26th & 28TH

Packages range from $85-$185

Call 770-386-2702 for your appointment.

 

Henry Cho returns to The Grand on Saturday, March 5th

 

 

The Century Bank Entertainment Series at The Grand Theatre continues when comedian Henry Cho returns to The Grand on Saturday, March 5th at 7:00 p.m. This is the second time the Cho has been in The Grand. He performed before a sold out theatre in 2011.

 

Henry’s TV credits include appearances on NBC’s The Tonight Show, CBS’s The Late, Late, Show, and NBC’s Young Comedians Special. He served two years as host of NBC’s Friday Night Videos and had many guest roles on various network sitcoms. Henry was co-creator, co-producer and co-writer of “The Henry Cho Show” on GAC. Henry’s one hour Comedy Central Special, “What’s That Clickin Noise?” is currently running and he can also be heard daily on Sirrus, XM and Blue Collar Radio. He’s also a regular performer at the Grand Ole Opry.

 

Some of Henry’s film credits include Universal’s McHale’s Navy with Tom Arnold and David Allen Greer; Say It Isn’t So with Heather Graham and Sally Field; and Material Girls with Hilary Duff and Angelica Houston produced by Madonna.

 

Henry was the keynote entertainer for The 59th Annual Radio & Television Correspondents’ Dinner and has worked extensively with Vince Gill, Amy Grant, Willie Nelson, Carrie Underwood and many, others. Henry’s clean comedy is so versatile that he can headline Vegas and then tour with Michael W. Smith in the same month.

 

Henry is currently in pre-production for the Indy film “Saving Faith” in which he will be part of the cast and also co-produce. The film begins shooting end of April. Henry is also in high demand by corporations due to the fact he is bankable and his show is clean. He has performed for hundreds of companies.

 

Orchestra level tickets are $25 and balcony level seats are $20. This is a reserved seating event. Purchase your tickets online at www.thegrandtheatre.org, at The Grand Theatre ticket office, located at 7 North Wall Street in downtown Cartersville, or by calling 770-386-7343. Visa, MasterCard, Discover Card, and American Express are accepted. The ticket office hours are Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

 

The Grand Theatre also has tickets available for the final event of the Century Bank Entertainment Series when Collin Raye returns to The Grand on April 16th. More show information and video samples can be found by visiting The Grand Theatre website at www.thegrandtheatre.org or on Facebook at “Century Bank Entertainment Series at The Grand Theatre”.

 

 

About Century Bank

Century Bank is Cartersville’s only locally owned, community bank, specializing in a quality and level of service not available from a megabank. Their core values optimize what a bank should be. Century Bank of Georgia is located at 215 East Main Street in Cartersville.